Unpacking the Barr Letter re Mueller ~ Rosenzweig // Lawfare – Brookings Institution

 Prosecutorial discretion! 

Paul Rosenzweig carefully analyzes the ambiguities in Attorney General Barr’s letter on the still secret Mueller report which reportedly concluded that the Trump campaign did not conspire with the Russian government to steal data and interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

The second aspect is that despite conflicting evidence Mueller decided not to charge Trump with obstruction of justice.  The key factors are likely difficulties of proof of intent (liars lying), and adherence to Justice Department policy not to charge if there is another remedy – here impeachment by the U.S. House of Representatives. – gwc

Source: OTHERWISE: Unpacking the Barr Letter re Mueller ~ Rosenzweig // Lawfare – Brookings Institution

55 years after first SCOTUS appearance, lawyer is back for second redistricting case

Source: 55 years after first SCOTUS appearance, lawyer is back for second redistricting case

Another good thing about legal academia.  No mandatory retirement age. – gwc

Bondurant’s current age is 82, and he says he has no plans to retire or to quit his work to improve democracy through the courts.

“I’d rather spend my time doing that than playing golf, in part because I play golf so badly that the opportunity not to play is itself a positive,” Bondurant told NPR. “But this is really important stuff, and it’s very fundamental.”

 

Discriminatory Driver’s License Suspension Schemes – American Constitution Society

Danielle Conley of Wilmer Hale and former associate Ariel Levinson have authored an issue brief on Discriminatory License Suspension Schemes.  It is an important access to justice and right to counsel issue.

Source: OTHERWISE: Discriminatory Driver’s License Suspension Schemes – American Constitution Society

New Jersey Supreme Court Rejects Mandatory Malpractice Insurance, embraces disclosure of coverage

The New Jersey Supreme Court has issued a Notice to the Bar.  It has rejected in part, accepted in part, and deferred in part the recommendations of its Ad Hoc Committee on Attorney Malpractice Insurance.  It concurred with the November 2017 report recommendation that malpractice insurance not be mandated for all private practitioners.  The Court retains its Rule 1:21-1A that all limited liability firms must carry insurance in the minimum amount of $100,000 (multiplied by the number of attorneys in the firm). The Court concurred with its Committee that lawyers be required to publicly register evidence of the coverage they carry.  The Administrative Office of the Courts is directed to develop procedures to implement the principle.  And the Court announced that it will revisit at an unspecified date whether attorneys who lack coverage should be required to disclose that fact. – gwc

Source: OTHERWISE: New Jersey Supreme Court Rejects Mandatory Malpractice Insurance, embraces disclosure of coverage

 

OTHERWISE: Harvard Law Prof Defends Decision to Represent Weinstein

Source: OTHERWISE: Harvard Law Prof Defends Decision to Represent Weinstein

Ronald Sullivan, a former Public Defender and the Director of Harvard Law’s criminal justice program, is one of the most prominent criminal defense lawyers in the country.  An African American long associated with criminal justice reform, he has drawn disapproval from some for signing on to the defense team of Harvey Weinstein, the Hollywood mogul now under indictment for sexual assault.

After students criticized him, including the editors of the student-edited daily Harvard Crimson fifty two Harvard Law Professors rose to his defense in an open letter.
Sullivan has now defended himself in a long interview published today in the New York magazine.

– GWC

From Riehlmann to Thompson

I have just heard the Podcast from the New Yorker Radio Hour called John Thompson v. American Justice. The Podcast connects the story from Riehlmann (Chapter 6) to Connick v. Thompson (Chapter 7).  This includes interviews with Riehlmann and District Attorney Connick, as well as long interviews with John Thompson. I highly recommend for you and your students too.  It runs about an hour, but is incredibly provocative and on point for the themes in both chapters.